Commenting on the report out today from the Alcohol Health Alliance (AHA), a spokesperson from NHS Health Scotland said:

“The finding from the Alcohol Health Alliance that fewer than 10% of the alcohol products surveyed carry the weekly drinking guidelines is a cause for concern.  As a leading cause of illness and early death, alcohol consumption and related harm remains a significant and preventable public health issue – and we know that people in poorer areas are hit the hardest. 

“NHS Health Scotland takes an evidence based approach to its work.  This means gathering, sharing and then supporting action on the best available evidence of what works to reduce health inequalities and improve health.  The same principle applies to individual behaviours.  People have a right to know the harms associated with alcohol and to live in a society that supports them to act on this evidence.  Accessible information is a first step, and most alcohol producers have not taken that step. Alcohol is no ordinary commodity.

“Information provision, including labelling on bottles, is a necessary element within an effective prevention plan.  Supporting translation of that knowledge into individual action is also essential and must be the difference we are driven to make if we are to reduce alcohol related health inequalities and improve health.”

 

You can find more information on alcohol and health inequalities in our alcohol section.

 

You can read the report from the Alcohol Health Alliance (AHA) on their site.